FIGURE INSTRUCTIONS AND "BASHING" IDEAS

nb

 
GENERAL:
My figures are cast from white Polyurethane Resin. This material can be cut with a razor saw, a hacksaw, a Dremel cut-off disk, or even flush-cutting pliers (like Xuron). Sandpaper or a file can be used to smooth or alter surfaces. When parts are to be joined, I recommend either "Super Glue" (Alpha Cyanoacrylate, ACC) or 5-Minute Epoxy glue for all assembly. Any gaps remaining can be filled with an epoxy putty such as Magic Sculpt, Epoxy Sculpt by Aves, or even generic "epoxy plumber's putty" from a hardware store.


nb

ASSEMBLY:
Basic assembly of the figure simply consists of sanding or scraping away any remaining mold lines, and then gluing the parts together in the desired positions.
To allow for joint movement after assembly, mating surfaces can be center-drilled, and a "press-fit" wireinserted and glued only on one side of the joint. This way, the head/hands can be pressed into place, rotated in any direction, or interchanged with other parts for variety.


nb

PAINT:
All parts should be washed thoroughly with soap and water just before any paint is applied, since casting or glue residues or oils from handling may still be on the surfaces, and may interact the paint. Resin accepts all kinds of paint. I suggest a light coat of neutral (gray or beige) primer, to provide a uniform surface and color base for finish paint. The primed surface will also help you to see any remaining gaps. I use "rattle-cans" of (sandable or self-etching) auto-body primer from an Auto Parts Store.

Although the primed resin will accept most oils or enamels, I use inexpensive craft acrylic paints, which  are ideal for finish painting. They come in a wide range of colors, and may be further inter-mixed on a pallet to meet any specific needs.


bar
  
ALTERATIONS (KIT-BASHING):

CAUTION: OVERHEATING RESIN MAY RESULT IN BURNS, AND CAN RUIN A PART.
Start gently, and only heat until part is just flexible.

TO SEE AN EXAMPLE OF "FIGURE BASHING" ON FIGURE #!, GO TO THE "BASH" PAGE !
 
Changes in the positions of limbs and even the body are easy with a resin figure. The easiest is to change the angle of an arm or leg to match a particular final location or pose.

Small Changes: To make small changes in the position or angle of an elbow, wrist, fingers, or leg, simply heat the part with a heat gun or "toaster oven" set at about 150 deg.F. When moderately heated, the part becomes soft and pliable, but does not lose it's shape. Test often to find the ideal flex point. Carefully (using gloves or tools) take hold of the heated part, bend it (at a joint) to the desired angle, and hold until cool, or run it under cold water. When cooled, the part will hold its new shape. This is particularly useful for bending fingers to better hold a tool or lever.

Larger Changes:  To change the position of a shoulder, elbow, hip, or knee, first cut the parts at the joints. Again, a razor saw or hacksaw may be used. Then, drill and add wires to the joint (as described above), to allow for posing. If a large angle change is required, some resin may have to be cut or sanded away at the joint. Be careful to measure first, and maintain overall limb lengths or the figure will look "wonky" (not normal). Small calipers are handy for keeping limbs the correct length.
    Once the "wired" limb is in the desired position, glue it in place. Remaining gaps can be filled with an epoxy putty such as Magic Sculpt, Epoxy Sculpt by Aves, or even "epoxy plumber's putty". as mentioned above.

Body Changes: The pose of the body can also be altered, but remember there is no single anatomical "joint" here, just a continuous bend of the spinal column. The "heat and bend" technique will not work well with the body, because it is too thick. You can, however, add a slight rotation or bend at the waist. If you do this, use the same "drill-wire-glue-fill" procedure described above. You will notice that any movement at the waist will leave large gaps and areas where sanding and filling will be required. 


bar

For more information, or to discuss ideas or problems, email me at  cspirito41@gmail.com